Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Updating Links in Copied Files.

Updating Links in Copied Files

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 20, 2015)

3

Let's say you have two workbooks that you use for tracking sales in the current month, 2015JuneA.xls and 2015JuneB.xls, and that 2015JuneA.xls contains links to data in 2015JuneB.xls. When it comes time to copy the workbooks for the new month, you may be wondering about the best way to update all the links in the first workbook so they point to the second workbook for the new month.

To prepare workbooks for the new month, most people will open a Windows folder and copy the workbook files within Windows, not even in Excel. This, however, is the way to guarantee that you do the most work in updating the files. A simpler way is to bypass Windows and do the saving in Excel. Follow these general steps:

  1. Open both 2015JuneA.xls and 2015JuneB.xls in Excel.
  2. Use Save As to save the 2015JuneB.xls file under the name 2015JulyB.xls.
  3. Use Save As to save the 2015Junexls file under the name 2015JulyA.xls.

As part of saving out 2015JulyB.xls (step 2), Excel automatically updates all the links in 2015JuneA.xls so that they point to the new file name. When you then save 2015JulyA.xls (step 3), you complete the cycle and end up with the new workbooks for the new month, with the past month's files still secure on disk.

If saving the files under new names in Excel is not possible for some reason (perhaps someone else already made a copy of the workbook for the new month and made changes in the file) then you will need to resort to doing some manual editing of the links. Fortunately you can use the Find and Replace features of Excel to help in this task:

  1. Open the 2015JulyA.xls file.
  2. Press Ctrl+H to display the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  4. In the Find What box, enter the root portion of the old worksheet name (2011JuneB).
  5. In the Replace With box, enter the root portion of the new worksheet name (2011JulyB).
  6. Click Replace All.

Excel goes through the entire worksheet—including the links—and makes changes to the appropriate text.

Another approach is to deal with your monthly files as a whole. In other words, don't have the filenames reflect the month, but put all the workbooks for the month in a single folder that is named after the month. Under this scenario, you could have a June folder, and then make a copy of the whole folder and name it July. You would then have duplicate copies of the workbooks in separate folders. You could work with them independently, as long as you don't try to open the same workbook from both months at the same time. (Excel won't allow you to open multiple workbooks with the same name.)

If you want to make your linking strategy more flexible, you can always use the INDIRECT function. For instance, suppose that your link is something like this:

=[2015JuneB.xls]Sheet1!B3

You could put the name of the source file (2011JuneB.xls) in a cell in the current worksheet (D5, for example) and replace the above expression with one like this:

=INDIRECT("[" & D5 & "]Sheet1!B3")

Changing the contents of cell D5 to a different filename will make that file the new source of data. There are a couple of "gottchas," however. First of all, you need to manually open the file that is the target of the link; Excel won't do it for you as it would with a regular link. Also, workbook filenames that contain spaces will trip up the INDIRECT formula. If you think you might have spaces in your filenames, you should change the formula to this:

=INDIRECT("['" & D5 & "']Sheet1!B3")

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11027) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Updating Links in Copied Files.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 6 - 4?

2016-12-08 10:02:36

Konstantin Detchkov

My question is how to avoid Excel from changing the links when I "Save As."

Example:
I have a main file called "Rent Payment Log". It tracks only the payments made for different tenants. In that file I have "Payment Amount." This is linked to another file for "Arrears" where the "Payment Amount" is deducted from "Current Arrears". However, I need to save the "Rent Payment Log" for each month - "Rent Payment Log - January". Whenever I do that the links in in the "Arrears" file get changed to the new file "Rent Payment Log - January" instead of the main file, which is where I need them to stay permanently. How can I make sure that those links do not get changed when I am saving a file?


2016-09-19 23:35:32

ZZZ

I think the year should be 2015 not 2011 as they suggest when to perform Cntrl + H command. Mistype?


2015-11-13 16:28:59

Mike

Your final tip of :

=INDIRECT("['" & D5 & "']Sheet1!B3")

helped me out, but I had to tweak it to make it work.

I had to reverse the [ and the ' early on

=INDIRECT("'[" & D5 & "']Sheet1!B3")

the single quotation mark at the end of the bracketed section was moved between end of Sheet1 and the !

=INDIRECT("['" & D5 & "]Sheet1'!B3")

Thanks for the tips!


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