Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing Workbooks in a Folder.

Printing Workbooks in a Folder

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 16, 2021)

1

Have you collected a bunch of workbooks in a folder, and you want to print all of them at once? There are a couple of quick and easy ways you can do this. The first method involves the use of Windows, not Excel. Follow these general steps:

  1. Display the folder that contains all the documents you want to print.
  2. Create a selection set of the documents you want to print. (Select them all, using Ctrl and Shift to help put the selection set together.)
  3. Right-click on one of the selected workbooks. Windows displays a Context menu.
  4. Choose Print from the Context menu.

Excel is automatically started and each workbook is printed, in turn. You can also apply a variation on this approach:

  1. Display the Open dialog box. (In Excel 2007 and Excel 2010, just press Ctrl+O. In Excel 2013 press Ctrl+O and then click Computer | Browse.) In later versions of Excel press Ctrl+ O and then click Browse.
  2. Using the controls in the dialog box, display the folder that contains the workbooks you want to print.
  3. Create a selection set of the workbooks you want to print.
  4. Right-click the selection set and choose Print from the resulting Context menu.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11166) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing Workbooks in a Folder.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Specifying the Behavior of the Enter Key

You type information in a cell and press Enter. What happens then? Excel allows you to specify exactly what should ...

Discover More

Determining the Length of a Text File

When processing plain text files in a macro, it is often helpful to know how much data the file contains. The normal way ...

Discover More

Changing Characters on Keyboard Keys

Want to assign some fancy characters to keyboard keys for characters you seldom use? There are a couple of ways you can ...

Discover More

Excel Smarts for Beginners! Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. Check out Excel 2013 For Dummies today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Printing an Entire Workbook by Default

Need to print an entire workbook? It's as easy as adding a single line of code to your macros.

Discover More

Using the Keyboard to Control Page Display in Print Preview

Sometimes it is just easier to use the keyboard than it is to use the mouse. If you are a keyboard-oriented person, you ...

Discover More

Printing Only Non-Blank Worksheets

If you have a workbook containing many worksheets, you might want to print only those worksheets that have some sort of ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 + 4?

2021-01-16 22:36:18

Roy

Yeah... no workee, the doing it from the File|Open function. Always founders after the first printing saying there's a dialog box open.

Fine from Explorer though if the order they print in is important to you, you must select them in that order... AND EVEN THEN, the one you want printed FIRST has to be selected LAST.

That's a problem with anything you select in Explorer. It feeds through into any Office program, maybe into non-MS programs too. (I'm sure it does, it's just I don't use any in which I can test the thought since, for example, I only use Excel, not, say, Google's spreadsheet too, and most, say, accounting programs don't really have functionality that's affected.)

The problem is that the first thing selected acts as the end of the list, period. So set up a range in Excel that you want a user to select for his input (he sees a thing with selections, you work the magic in the background) and it selects the seven, say, cells he is allowed to edit with the starting one selected all ready for him to go... to do that, you have to build the range in order selecting that first, starting position cell last. Not first as you'd think.

Same thing here. Six files to print and order matters? Select them in the order you want except select the first to be printed last. So file 1-6 to be printed 2,4,6,3,5,1 would have to be selected in this order: 4,6,3,5,1,2.

Office 365, up to date when adding this comment, as regards "What version?" where the dialog box error is concerned. But I have tried this a few times over the years, since the early 90's when MS began touting the concept along with dragging a file icon onto a printer icon to print things. It's always had this issue, in my experience, as well as the "select the first to print (or 'to whatever') last" issue.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.