Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: File Formats that Include Field Formats.

File Formats that Include Field Formats

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 16, 2019)

3

Wolfgang often imports CSV files that are created by other programs. When importing, he needs to specify how Excel should treat the incoming data. This causes Wolfgang to wonder if there is a file format that Excel can import that has field formats embedded so that he doesn't have to do any manual work on import.

The short answer is no, there isn't such a format. Technically you can create an XML-formatted file that uses the format of Office, and it can specify what the field formats should be. Such a file consists of only text (like a traditional CSV file) and includes specifiers about how the data should be formatted. (Complete details on how such an XML file should be structured is beyond the scope of this tip.)

Such an endeavor is undeniably daunting to many people, so you could also simply import your CSV file with no formatting applied, and then use the macro recorder to record how you manually format the freshly imported data. This macro could then be executed every time you import another file that uses the same sort of data as the first CSV file you imported.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11602) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: File Formats that Include Field Formats.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 9 + 9?

2016-01-04 12:21:55

Steve Adams

Anne's suggestion works very well for me as well.

But for new files being imported for the first time, I have had some success in change the file extension of the CSV file to .TXT

Then open Excel first and then use the file open commands to locate the .TXT file (you will have to change the file type drop down from "All Excel Files..." to "Text Files..."

The Text Import Wizard will start automatically when opening a .TXT file.

On Step 1 select "Delimited"
If your file has page header text, you may need to select a starting row for the import (either your column header row if one exists or the first data row).

On Step 2 Select "Comma" for the delimiter (assuming you did start with a .CSV file).

On step 3 you can click on the various columns and identify some basic formats (General, Text, or Date) or to skip a column. If you have an identifying number that exceeds Excel's number place values (15 digits), select text for that column to prevent truncation (or to preserve leading zeros). Also, dates sometimes come across as text if you don't select the Date format.


2015-12-28 11:00:06

Anne

Further to my comment, I should specify to copy and paste VALUES, of course.


2015-12-28 10:11:35

Anne

I spend my days working with CSV and SAP files. I use them to create reports or gather information for reports. What I've done is create an excel spreadsheet formatted to my specifications, using the CSV data, initially. (I often use Excel Tables, as they maintain the formatting even when data is added below the last row.) I then copy and paste the data from the CSV file to the formatted spreadsheet - omitting the column headers as they would already exist in the formatting spreadsheet from previous reports. The CSV data automatically take on the formatting of the existing spreadsheet. For instance, the SAP file I use repeatedly have lots of numbers with leading zeros - like so - 00000000240. When I drop this into my formatted spreadsheet, it appears at 240, with no additional manipulation needed. Magic!


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