Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing All or Nothing.

Printing All or Nothing

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 23, 2018)

Karen is looking for a way to print an entire workbook, even if a user chooses to print a single worksheet. In other words, she is looking for a way to print either the entire workbook, or nothing at all—there should be no "in between" options.

The only way to handle this is through the use of a macro. VBA allows you to create macros that are initiated when certain events occur. One of the events that can trigger macros is the "print" event. When someone asks to print, or chooses to see a print preview, the BeforePrint event of the Workbook object is triggered. You can create your own macro that executes when the event is triggered.

Private Sub Workbook_BeforePrint(Cancel As Boolean)
    Dim sht As Variant
    Dim bPreview As Boolean
    Dim iResponse As Integer
    On Error GoTo ErrHandler

    iResponse = MsgBox(prompt:="Do you want to Print Preview?", _
        Buttons:=vbYesNoCancel, Title:="Preview?")

    Select Case iResponse
        Case vbYes
            bPreview = True
        Case vbNo
            bPreview = False
        Case Else
            GoTo ExitHandler
    End Select
    Application.EnableEvents = False
    For Each sht In Sheets
        If sht.Visible Then
            sht.PrintOut Preview:=bPreview
        End If
    Next

ExitHandler:
    Application.EnableEvents = True
    Cancel = True
    Exit Sub

ErrHandler:
    MsgBox Err.Description
    Resume ExitHandler
End Sub

Whenever Excel gets ready to print, or whenever print preview is invoked, the BeforePrint event is triggered and this macro runs. The macro first asks the user if he or she wants to do a print preview. A Select Case structure is used to set the bPreview variable based on the answer to the question. The setting of bPreview then controls what happens.

If the user clicked Cancel when asked about previewing, then the macro is exited and the printing is canceled. Otherwise, each worksheet in the workbook is examined to either print or preview. If the worksheet is visible, it is printed, and the Preview property is set equal to bPreview (True means that the worksheet is previewed; False means it is actually printed).

Notice that the macro sets the EnableEvents property to False. This is done so that no other events can trigger while printing or previewing. If EnableEvents is left "on," then every time the PrintOut method is used, the entire BeforePrint event is again triggered—the user would end up in an endless loop if event handling were not turned off.

Also, note that one of the last things to occur before exiting the macro is that the Cancel property is set to True. This is done so that the original print or print preview request that generated the BeforePrint event is cancelled. There is, after all, no need to complete that request, as the macro did all the print handling for the user.

There is one caveat, of course, to using this approach to printing: If macros are not enabled, the handler will not run and the user can print as desired. (Holding Shift while opening the workbook disables macros and the user most times is asked if they want to enable macros.) Other issues of ExcelTips have discussed this fact.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11629) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing All or Nothing.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Searching for Text With a Certain Format

The Find and Replace tool in Word is very powerful. You can use it to search not only for text but for the formatting ...

Discover More

Copying Subtotals

If you have added subtotals to your worksheet data, you might want to copy those subtotals somewhere else. This is easy ...

Discover More

Converting Tables to Charts

Put numeric information in a table and you can then convert that information to a graphical chart using Microsoft Graph ...

Discover More

Professional Development Guidance! Four world-class developers offer start-to-finish guidance for building powerful, robust, and secure applications with Excel. The authors show how to consistently make the right design decisions and make the most of Excel's powerful features. Check out Professional Excel Development today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Fitting Your Printout on a Page

Tired of wasting paper when you print a worksheet? You can scale Excel's output so that it fits only the number of pages ...

Discover More

Printing a Short Selection

Need to print just a portion of a worksheet? It's easy to do if you follow the steps in this tip.

Discover More

Executing a Macro After Printing is Done

You can modify Excel's BeforePrint event handler to change how the printing process occurs. Unfortunately, though, Excel ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is eight more than 3?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.