Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Returning a Worksheet Name.

Returning a Worksheet Name

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 6, 2016)

9

Looking for a way to put the name of your worksheet directly into a cell? Excel makes this easy through the use of the CELL function. If you include the following in a cell, Excel returns the full path of the workbook, along with the sheet name:

=CELL("filename")

For instance, if you entered this into a cell in the Sheet1 worksheet of the MyWB workbook, the information returned by Excel might be something like C:\My Documents\[MyWB.xls]Sheet1 (depending, of course, on the drive and directory in which the workbook is saved).

To return just the worksheet name from this value, you could use the following in your cell:

=MID(CELL("filename",A1),(FIND("]",CELL("filename",A1))+1),50)

This will work for any worksheet name up to 50 characters in length. (If you routinely use different lengths, simply change the value in the formula.) Continuing the earlier example, Excel would return Sheet1 as the result.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11766) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Returning a Worksheet Name.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is nine less than 9?

2016-02-09 10:04:00

Maria

Micky, this worked just as I needed. Thank you very much. Thank you also, Chuck. I did try your suggestion as well, but it kept opening an explorer window.

Appreciate both your responses!!
Maria


2016-02-09 09:12:23

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@Maria,
Try to run the following macro:

Sub MakeSheetsList()
SC = Sheets.Count
Columns(1).Clear
For SH = 1 To SC
Cells(SH, 1) = Sheets(SH).Name
Next
End Sub
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” MVP – Excel (2009-2016)
ISRAEL


2016-02-08 14:45:02

Chuck rese

Maria,
I use a simple solution to this problem. I use the formula shown, somewhere in the sheet whose name you want. Then in the second sheet, just enter a formula that references the cell in the first sheet that has the name in it.

For example:
in sheet1, cell A1
=MID(CELL("filename",A1),FIND("]",CELL("filename",A1))+1,31)
in sheet2, cell A1
=Sheet1!$A$1

Not particularly elegant, but it works.


2016-02-08 10:00:51

Maria

Is there a way to use this to get the names of the other sheets in the same file? I am looking for a way to list all the sheet names in the first sheet (a summary type page). Thank you.


2016-02-08 07:16:29

allen

I tried using this in a subroutine but must be doing something wrong. Can you provide an example?


2016-02-07 10:49:08

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@Jim,
My answer to your question is simple - usually users are looking for the shortest(!) formula which provides the merchandise - such as:
=MID(CELL("filename",A1),FIND("]",CELL("filename",A1))+1,31)
(Please note that a worksheet's name cannot exceed 31 characters).
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” MVP – Excel (2009-2016)
ISRAEL


2016-02-06 11:01:57

Jim

@Allen - you'll always get a "#VALUE" error using a function that returns the file-path in a book that hasn't been saved - because until you save the file, there is no path (location on the disk) for excel to return.


2016-02-06 10:52:13

Jim

Why not use RIGHT instead of MID to return just the sheet name?

=RIGHT(CELL("filename"),LEN(CELL("filename"))-FIND("]",CELL("filename")))

This will return everything to the right of the "]", regardless of the length of the sheet-name.


2016-02-06 09:16:50

Allen Cody

This is a handy tip, and I'll try it in a VBA subroutine to see if it works.

I tried this in my personal.xlsb file (worksheet formula) and got a "value" error, also in a new, unsaved file "book1" with the same result. When I opened a saved *.xlsm file, it worked fine.


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