Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Dissecting a String.

Dissecting a String

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated February 23, 2022)
This tip applies to Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365


1

If you have used BASIC before, you will be right at home with the string functions provided by VBA. The following table details the most common string functions and what they return.

Function Comments
Left(Source, Count) Returns the left Count characters of Source text.
Mid(Source, Start [, Count]) Returns the portion of Source text beginning with the Start character. If Count is supplied, then the result is limited to that many characters.
Right(Source, Count) Returns the right Count characters of Source text.

Remember that these are VBA functions, not worksheet functions. Excel provides worksheet functions that do largely the same things, but those functions place different requirements on which parameters are required and which are optional.

Note:

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ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12574) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Dissecting a String.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 2 + 5?

2018-03-10 10:43:26

Brian L.

One of my favorites is the SPLIT function -- very useful for break up strings into component parts, based on a specified delimiter. See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6x627e5f(v=vs.90).aspx ("archived" article, but has good examples).


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