Dynamically Changing Worksheet Tab Color

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 13, 2019)

2

Andrew knows how to change the color of worksheet tabs manually. However, he would like a way to change the tab color based upon a value in a cell on the worksheet.

To do this, you'll need to use a macro. The key is that you want to change the Color property of the Tab object, in this manner:

ActiveSheet.Tab.Color = vbRed

The logic you use to get to the point of making such a color assignment depends on what you want to do and when you want to do it. Assuming that you want to change the tab color based on what is in cell A1, you could use a macro like the following:

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
    MyVal = Range("A1").Text

    With ActiveSheet.Tab
        Select Case MyVal
            Case "0"
                .Color = vbBlack
            Case "1"
                .Color = vbRed
            Case "2"
                .Color = vbGreen
            Case "3"
                .Color = vbYellow
            Case "4"
                .Color = vbBlue
            Case "5"
                .Color = vbMagenta
            Case "6"
                .Color = vbCyan
            Case "7"
                .Color = vbWhite
            Case Else
                .ColorIndex = xlColorIndexNone
        End Select
    End With
End Sub

You need to add the macro to the code for the worksheet whose tab you want to modify. (Right-click the sheet's tab and choose View Code from the Context menu. Paste the code into that code window.) The macro grabs whatever is in cell A1 and then uses a Select Case structure to change the color of the tab. The logic changes the color if A1 contains 0 through 7. If there is anything else there (or nothing at all), then the ColorIndex property is used to set the tab color back to its default.

The macro could be modified so that what it tests for is a text string (such as "Black", "Red", etc.) or some keyword (such as "Low" or "High"). You could also use different color designations with the Color property, such as the RGB function:

                .Color = RGB(255, 0, 0)

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (13138) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is nine more than 5?

2019-07-17 05:36:06

Gandhi, Shreepad

Hei Willy. Tried your macro. It works well. Thanks.


2019-07-13 11:36:09

Willy Vanhaelen

Although the macro presented in this tip works, it works to well. When you make any change anywhere in this sheet the macro sets the color of the tab over and over again although cell A1 didn't change. A waste of time!!!

The following macro changes the tab color only if the value in cell A1 changes which is of course more efficient:

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
If Target.Address <> "$A$1" Then Exit Sub
With Me.Tab
Select Case Target
Case 1: .Color = vbBlack
Case 2: .Color = vbRed
Case 3: .Color = vbGreen
Case 4: .Color = vbYellow
Case 5: .Color = vbBlue
Case 6: .Color = vbMagenta
Case 7: .Color = vbCyan
Case 8: .Color = vbWhite
Case Else: .ColorIndex = xlColorIndexNone
End Select
End With
End Sub


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