Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Anchoring Comment Boxes in Desired Locations.

Anchoring Comment Boxes in Desired Locations

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 13, 2018)

2

Bill is creating a form using Excel, and he has attached comments to the column headings to remind people what goes in each column. When the mouse pointer is moved over the column heading, the comment box always pops up to the right of the column, which is a problem for those columns near the right side of the screen—the boxes appear off the screen, to the right of the column. Bill wondered if there is a way to tell the comment box where it should pop up.

The short answer is that there isn't any way to control where the pop-up comment box will appear; it always appears to the right, and it's position is always reset every time the pop-up action occurs. If you configure Excel so that comment boxes are always visible (i.e., they don't "pop up"), then you can position the individual comment boxes. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 or a later version display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Advanced.
  3. Scroll down until you see the Display options. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Advanced options of the Word Options dialog box.

  5. Select the Comments and Indicators radio button.
  6. Click on OK.

The comments should now be visible, and you can position them as desired. The drawback to this approach, of course, is that if you have a lot of comments in your worksheet, the screen can appear quite cluttered. If you change back so that only the comment indicator is shown, then the positions you set are lost, and the pop-ups (when you move the mouse pointer over the cell) again appear to the right of the cell.

Another approach to displaying the comments you want is to use the data validation feature in Excel instead of actual comments. (You can use the Input Message tab of the Data Validation dialog box to set the message to be displayed when the cell is selected.) There are a couple of operational differences between the data validation input messages and the regular comments. First, the message is best associated with the actual input cell, not with any header cell for the column. (This way the message is displayed when the user actually starts to make input.) Second, a cell for which there is an input message does not have a small indicator in the upper-right corner, as is the case with comments.

The benefit to using the data validation input messages is that the message will always be visible on the screen; it does not default to displaying to the right, as comments do. In addition, you can manually position the messages where you want, and Excel remembers that position.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7559) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Anchoring Comment Boxes in Desired Locations.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three more than 8?

2018-01-14 15:28:27

Mandora

A tip from Contextures that allows user to place comments on the screen in a place designated by the user. I have used it and it works.

Public Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal Target As Range)
'www.contextures.com/xlcomments03.html
'This code places comments in a central location in window when cell is selected. _
Some adjustments can be made in the cTop, cWidth code below.

'NOTE: The commented cell must have protection unlocked in the cell's properties.

Dim rng As Range
Dim cTop As Long
Dim cWidth As Long
Dim cmt As Comment
Dim Sh As Shape

Application.DisplayCommentIndicator = xlCommentIndicatorOnly
Set rng = ActiveWindow.VisibleRange
cTop = rng.Top + rng.Height / 15 'Default is 2 which places comment near middle of window
cWidth = rng.Left + rng.Width / 1.5 'Default is 2 which places comment near middle of window

If ActiveCell.Comment Is Nothing Then
'do nothing
Else
Set cmt = ActiveCell.Comment
Set Sh = cmt.Shape
Sh.Top = cTop - Sh.Height / 15 'Default is 2 which places comment near middle of window
Sh.Left = cWidth - Sh.Width / 1.5 'Default is 2 which places comment near middle of window
cmt.Visible = True
End If
End Sub


2018-01-14 11:55:36

Marty Plante

Hello Allen,

I've used the comments as a reminder to myself as to where I was at in developing a spreadsheet, and for turning over a spreadsheet for others to use. Often it provides that sort of "tool tip" feature to save repeating instructions, etc. What I have found is that by adding many of the comment related buttons to a customized ribbon section I can access and essentially scroll through all the comments quickly, show or hide all, etc., so that they serve their purpose but then remain out of the way. I have six buttons - New comment, Previous comment, Next comment, Delete, Show/Hide, Show All. Maybe this method will be helpful for others.


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