Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Retrieving Drive Statistics.

Retrieving Drive Statistics

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 30, 2018)

8

If you are creating a full-blown application using Excel, you may want to know a bit about the environment in which your application is running. For instance, you might want to know how many drives are attached to the system, what their drive letters are, and how much space they have free.

The following macro will retrieve the requested information. All you need to do is provide the column headings. The macro assumes that you'll have three columns: In cell A1 you should place the heading "Drive," in cell B1 you place the heading "Free%," and in cell C1 you place the heading "Used%." In addition, you should format columns B and C as percentages.

Sub DriveSizes()
    Dim Drv As Drive
    Dim fs As New FileSystemObject
    Dim Letter As String
    Dim Total As Variant
    Dim Free As Variant
    Dim FreePercent As Variant
    Dim TotalPercent As Variant
    Dim i As Integer

    On Error Resume Next
    i = 2
    For Each Drv In fs.drives
        If Drv.IsReady Then
            Letter = Drv.DriveLetter
            Total = Drv.TotalSize
            Free = Drv.FreeSpace
            
            FreePercent = Free / Total
            TotalPercent = 1 - FreePercent

            Cells(i, 1).Value = Letter
            Cells(i, 2).Value = FreePercent
            Cells(i, 3).Value = TotalPercent
            i = i + 1
        End If
    Next
End Sub

When you first run this macro, you may get an error. If you do, it means that you need to configure your macro to reference the Microsoft Scripting Runtime. Follow these steps from within the VBA Editor:

  1. Choose the References option from the Tools menu. VBA displays the References dialog box.
  2. In the list of available references, make sure Microsoft Scripting Runtime is selected.
  3. Click on OK.

Now the macro should run just fine, and you will have a fully populated table representing all the drives available on your system. (If your system has drives that use removable media—such as floppy drives—they may not show up unless you have media in them.)

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11214) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Retrieving Drive Statistics.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 0 + 4?

2019-02-14 08:05:44

Ken Varley

"Dim Drv As Drive" failed with "User defined type not defined"

Presumably some other instruction needs to be added to define the DRIVE type


2018-12-01 12:11:48

Willy Vanhaelen

@Paul
On one hard disk you can have several partitions and they have each their own drive letter and they each have their used and unused percentages even if each drive has it's own entire physical disk. I have no experience with servers but I suppose that it will be the same.


2018-11-30 15:34:16

Paul

Ignore my last question. I just realized that most of the "drives" I have are all on one server and obviously they are all the same amount of free space, since it is on the same hard drive.


2018-11-30 15:27:35

Paul

Great for Drive letters! Thanks! How easy would it be to change the macro to do the root folders on a server (even the ones you are not naturally assigned a drive letter to)?


2014-12-03 22:05:10

Locke Garmin

You're welcome! I remember how excited I was too when I realized it could be that simple. :)


2014-11-28 02:22:05

Dave K

@ Locke Garmin:

Thank you SO MUCH for that tip! Up to now I have been using one line of code per cell to assign column headers.

Not any more!!!


2014-11-27 09:30:47

Locke Garmin

One thing I like to do is add header columns in the macro in this way:

Range("A1:C1") = Array("Drive", "Free%", "Used%")


2014-11-27 08:34:37

balthamossa2b

Very nice tip.

I love how powerful FSOs are, you can pretty much do anything with them.


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