Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing Multiple Selections.

Printing Multiple Selections

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 2, 2016)

3

You may have a need at times to print out a group of selections from different worksheets and have them appear on a single sheet of paper. Perhaps the easiest way to do this is to simply set up a "consolidation" worksheet that you would actually use for your printing. Follow these general directions:

  1. Create a new worksheet to be used for consolidation/printing.
  2. Select the range on the worksheet that you wish to print.
  3. Press Ctrl+C to copy the selection.
  4. Go to the new sheet and select the cell where you want the information to appear.
  5. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  6. Click the drop-down arrow under the Paste tool (left side of the ribbon) and then choose Paste Special. Excel displays the Paste Special dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  7. Figure 1. The Paste Special dialog box.

  8. Click on Paste Link. The dialog box disappears and the linked information appears in the worksheet.
  9. Repeat steps 2 through 7 for any other ranges you want included on the printout.
  10. Print the worksheet with the consolidated information.

The one big drawback to this approach is that if the worksheets from which you are copying have radically different formatting, you may not be able to merge them into a consolidated worksheet satisfactorily. (You will need to adjust the formatting in the consolidation sheet after pasting the different ranges.) In this case you may need to adjust formatting to get exactly the effect you desire.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12204) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing Multiple Selections.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two more than 4?

2016-04-04 11:22:19

Steve Adams

Another option is to use the camera tool (which can be added to the quick access toolbar from the list of commands not in the ribbon).

On the source sheet (which will need to be unprotected while capturing the area desired), you can select the desire block and then click the camera tool. Switch to the destination sheet and click to paste a link dynamic image. The image can be moved, resized, and cropped, etc. The image is linked to the source so changes to the source region will also appear in the linked image.

Advantage would be to use it where different column widths and row heights make the paste link of cells hard to position on one page.


2016-04-02 12:44:57

Robert C

Bill,
Excellent idea to paste and link onto a PowerPoint slide, the formatting is independent on each slide and I don't have to worry about formatting for each page.
Also, my team will not have to print it; but rather use the ppt directly onto their presentations... saving a lot of paper.
Thanks a lot for this tip, you just solved us three problems with this alternate solution.
Robert


2016-04-02 11:55:42

Bill

As another option, you could cut and paste to a Word document or PowerPoint slide.


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