Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Turning Off Display of Zeros for All Worksheets.

Turning Off Display of Zeros for All Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 18, 2017)

2

King knows how to turn off the display of zeros in Excel for individual worksheets. He wants to turn it off by default so that every worksheet he opens, zeros are not displayed. If he wants zeros, he knows he can turn on the display of zeros.

One way to get this to happen is to set up your own default workbook. Follow these steps:

  1. Open a new Excel workbook.
  2. Set up the workbook the way you want it to appear, by default. (Make sure you turn off the display of zero values in the Options dialog box.)
  3. Choose Save As from the File tab of the ribbon, or press F12. Excel displays the Save As dialog box.
  4. In the Save As Type pull-down list at the bottom of the dialog box, select Excel Template (*.xltx).
  5. The file name you use should be Book.xltx.
  6. Save your newly created template in the XLStart folder. (Do not save it in the default template folder.)

If you are unsure of where the XLStart folder is located (step 6), use the Find feature of Windows to locate the folder. With the template in that folder, any time you create a new workbook, the settings within the workbook (including whether zero values are displayed or not) should be set according to however they were in the template.

Of course, this approach doesn't help with existing workbooks or with workbooks that you may receive from others. In that case, you may want to adopt the use of a couple of small macros that control the display of zero values.

Sub Display0()
    ActiveWindow.DisplayZeros = True
End Sub
Sub Hide0()
    ActiveWindow.DisplayZeros = False
End Sub

The first macro (Display0) turns on the display of zero values, while the second (Hide0) turns off the display. These could easily be assigned to toolbar buttons or shortcut keys so you don't have to wade through the Options dialog box to turn the display on and off.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12456) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Turning Off Display of Zeros for All Worksheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is eight minus 8?

2017-11-21 09:55:07

Nick from London

When I had the old tool bars not only did I have a macro toggling the display of Zero but the Tool Bar button swapped.

Most of my old custom buttons can be found on the ribbon but not this one.

It would be nice to replicate the old toolbar button but my Ribbon knowledge is not up to it anyone got a link, so an old dog can learn new tricks.

Nick


2017-11-18 05:43:26

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@To whom it may concern
I prefer (and did so) to use a SINGLE button placed on the QAT which Toggles the state of the Zero Display.
---------------------------
Sub Toggle_Zeros_Display()
ActiveWindow.DisplayZeros = Not (ActiveWindow.DisplayZeros)
End Sub
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft®” Excel MVP – Excel (2009-2018)
ISRAEL


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