Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Zooming with the Keyboard.

Zooming With the Keyboard

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 31, 2018)

2

For most purposes, Excel allows you to issue commands and perform functions by using either the mouse or the keyboard. Unfortunately, Excel does not provide “equal access” for all commands. For instance, it is relatively easy to zoom in or out using the mouse, but there is no easy way to do it using the keyboard (other than using the keyboard to traverse the menus and select a zoom setting).

If you want the ability to zoom in or out easily using the keyboard, the only way to get it is to create a macro and then assign the macro to a keyboard combination. The following VBA macro (MyZoomIn) allows you to zoom in to (enlarge) a worksheet by 10%:

Sub MyZoomIn()
   Dim ZP As Integer
   ZP = Int(ActiveWindow.Zoom * 1.1)
   If ZP > 400 Then ZP = 400
   ActiveWindow.Zoom = ZP
End Sub

Notice that the macro only allows you to zoom in up to 400%. This is because Excel allows you to only zoom that high, and any higher would generate an error. A slight variation on the same theme results in a macro I call MyZoomOut. It zooms out of (reduces) a worksheet by 10%:

Sub MyZoomOut()
   Dim ZP As Integer
   ZP = Int(ActiveWindow.Zoom * 0.9)
   If ZP < 10 Then ZP = 10
   ActiveWindow.Zoom = ZP
End Sub

This macro sets the bottom boundary at 10%, which is the smallest you can go. Any smaller, and Excel would generate an error again.

The final trick to make these macros really useful is to assign them to a keyboard combination. You can then quickly zoom in or out by 10% with a simple keystroke. The following are the steps you can use to assign a macro to a keyboard combination:

  1. Press Alt+F8. Excel displays the Macro dialog box, which includes a list of your defined macros. (MyZoomIn and MyZoomOut should be among them.)
  2. Select the MyZoomIn macro.
  3. Click on Options. Excel displays the Macro Options dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Macro Options dialog box.

  5. In the Shortcut Key box, specify the shortcut you want to use. For instance, if you want to use Ctrl+I, you would enter an I in the Shortcut Key box.
  6. Click on OK.
  7. Select the MyZoomOut macro.
  8. Click on Options. Excel again displays the Macro Options dialog box.
  9. In the Shortcut Key box, specify the shortcut you want to use. For instance, if you want to use Ctrl+O, you would enter an O in the Shortcut Key box.
  10. Click on OK.
  11. Click on Cancel to close the Macro dialog box.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12582) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Zooming with the Keyboard.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 8 - 1?

2018-04-02 14:12:34

Daniel

Actually F6 will get you to the status bar and then you can arrow over to the zoom in or out. You do not need VBA for this.


2018-03-31 06:09:44

Willy Vanhaelen

Here is a one line variant of both macros:

Sub MyZoomIn()
ActiveWindow.Zoom = Application.Min(Int(ActiveWindow.Zoom * 1.1), 400)
End Sub

Sub MyZoomOut()
ActiveWindow.Zoom = Application.Max(Int(ActiveWindow.Zoom * 0.9), 10)
End Sub


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