Protecting Many Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 23, 2016)

Andre has a workbook that contains 52 worksheets. He would like to protect the worksheets, but not the workbook itself. Currently he individually protects all 52 sheets. He wonders if there is a way to protect them all in one go.

The only way to do this is to use a macro. Fortunately, the macro is quite short:

Sub ProtectAllSheets()
    Dim ws As Worksheet

    For Each ws In Worksheets
        ws.Protect
    Next
End Sub

When you run this macro, all of the worksheets in the workbook are protected, without specifying a password. (This means anyone can easily unprotect them.) If you want to specify a password, then you can do so with an easy modification:

Sub ProtectAllSheets()
    Dim ws As Worksheet

    For Each ws In Worksheets
        ws.Protect Password:="MyPassword"
    Next
End Sub

The password you specify will be used for each of the worksheets, meaning that all of them will use the same password.

You can easily modify these macros to unprotect all your worksheets by simply changing the .Protect method to .Unprotect.

You should also be aware that if your workbook or worksheets utilize some options that preclude worksheet protection (such as sharing), then the macros will generate an error.

An entirely different approach is to use a third-party utility to do the protecting. You can find such utilities with a quick Internet search; an example would be Asap Utilities (http://www.asap-utilities.com).

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7511) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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