Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Controlling Display of the Formula Bar.

Controlling Display of the Formula Bar

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 19, 2018)

3

The Formula Bar is the area at the top of the Excel window, just below the ribbon area or the Formatting toolbar, depending on your version of Excel. The Formula Bar has two parts: at the left is the Name Box, and to the right is the contents of the currently selected cell.

If you need more room to view a worksheet, or you don't need the information provided by the Formula Bar, you can turn it off. To control display of the Formula Bar, follow these steps:

  1. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 or a later version, display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options. Excel displays the Excel Options dialog box.
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Advanced.
  3. Scroll down until you see the Display options. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Advanced options of the Excel Options dialog box.

  5. Click on the Show Formula Bar check box. If it is selected, then the Formula Bar is displayed; not selected means it won't be displayed.
  6. Click on OK.

You can also use the Formula Bar option from the View tab of the ribbon. This option functions like a toggle—click on it once and the Formula Bar disappears; click again and it reappears.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7558) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Controlling Display of the Formula Bar.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 0 + 2?

2018-08-17 11:34:06

Morris Manning

JM, A web search suggests several approaches.

If the formula bar is missing entirely, go to View >Show and make sure Formula Bar is checked.

It is possible there may be a copy of Excel running in the background but not visible. Exit Excel. Go to Windows Task Manager > Processes and shut down any instance of Excel that may be running.

If none of the above works, try repairing Excel by running a repair on your office programs: Control Panel > Programs & Features.

Hope this helps.


2018-08-16 16:36:02

JM

I lost the pane that shows the cell column letter and row number, which is left to the formula bar. How do I activate it again? Is there a reason why it has gone missing? Thanks in advance.


2018-05-19 15:52:01

Mandora

To automate via VBA for a particular workbook, add the following code in the ThisWorkbook module:

Private Sub Workbook_Activate()
Application.DisplayFormulaBar = False 'Formula Bar hidden when workbook is opened.
End Sub

Private Sub Workbook_Deactivate()
Application.DisplayFormulaBar = True 'Formula Bar unhidden when workbook is closed.
End Sub

To make available on an adhoc basis, add the following macro to a PERSONAL .XLSB module and call with a button on the Quick Access Toolbar or assign to shortcut keys assignment.

Sub Toggle_FormulaBar()
If Application.DisplayFormulaBar = True Then
Application.DisplayFormulaBar = False
Else
Application.DisplayFormulaBar = True
End If
End Sub


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