Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Creating a Shortcut for Pasting Values.

Creating a Shortcut for Pasting Values

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 17, 2016)

One of the most often-used commands in Excel is the Paste Special option from the Edit menu, where you can figure out exactly how you want information pasted into a worksheet. On the Paste Special dialog box, the Values selection is undoubtedly the one used the most. Since pasting only values in this manner is used so often, you might think that Microsoft would provide a shortcut key to just paste values.

Unfortunately, they don't provide one. There are ways around this, however. One way is to just add a tool to the Quick Access Toolbar that pastes values for you. All you need to do is follow these steps:

  1. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 and later versions, display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Customize (Excel 2007) or Quick Access Toolbar (Excel 2010 and later versions). (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Quick Access Toolbar area of the Excel Options dialog box.

  4. Use the Choose Commands From drop-down list to choose All Commands.
  5. In the list of commands, choose Paste Values.
  6. Click the Add button. The command is copied to the right side of the screen.
  7. Click OK.

Now, whenever you want to paste just the values, you can click on the new tool.

If you don't want to use the mouse to paste values, then you can use the tried-and-true keyboard sequence to paste values: Alt, H, V, S, V, Enter. (Or you can use Alt, H, V, V, in newer versions of Excel for the same results.) This sequence selects the menus and dialog box options necessary to paste values.

If you want a shorter keyboard shortcut, the best way to do it is to create a macro that does the pasting for you, and then make sure that you assign a keyboard shortcut to the macro. For instance, create the following simple macro:

Sub PasteVal()
    Selection.PasteSpecial Paste:=xlValues
End Sub

Now, follow these steps:

  1. Press Alt+F8 to display the Macro dialog box.
  2. From the list of available macros, select the PasteVal macro you just created.
  3. Click on Options. Excel displays the Macro Options dialog box. (See Figure 2.)
  4. Figure 2. The Macro Options dialog box.

  5. In the Shortcut Key area, indicate the key you want used with the Ctrl key as your shortcut. For instance, if you want Ctrl+G to execute the macro, then enter a G in the Shortcut Key area.
  6. Click on OK to close the Macro Options dialog box.
  7. Click on Cancel to close the Macro dialog box.

Now, whenever you want to paste values, all you need to do is press Ctrl+G, the macro is run, and the values in the Clipboard are pasted to the selected cell. Of course, the one drawback to this method is that using the macro removes the use of the undo function; so if you make a mistake you'll either have to change it manually or return to your last saved version.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6283) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Creating a Shortcut for Pasting Values.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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